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20120928
20120928
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
in afghanistan and we have 68,000 troops there now. this is an entire foreign policy discussion we continue to have to define our enemies and to really know who we're facing and how to win. why are we still having this discussion? why is this so difficult to do? >> the biggest nightmare, the taliban is for us to not leave the region, to have a partnership with the afghan people past 2014. my hope we would withdraw most of our troops in 2014. leave 15 or 20,000 behind to aid the afghan army to make sure there is never a chance for the taliban to take the country over militarily. they know that. what are they trying to do? they're trying to break the partnership apart, the taliban. jenna: would you take the troops and put them in libya and go after the people that murdered our ambassador? >> i would work with the libyan government and the libyan people to have a joint operation to go after the terrorists. in afghanistan i would tell the taliban, you will never come back in power through the use of force. we'll never let this place become a safe haven for terrorists. we'll withdraw a troops su
. can any of these foreign policy questions and whether or not the administration bungled the response after the attacks, the horrible tragedy in benghazi, or the israeli relationship and whether mitt romney is correct that the administration has thrown israel under the bus, can any of these foreign policy questions come into it or does this have to be under the format strictly domestic policy. >> i think only if chip herrer asks the question. if romney were to launch an attack on libya or launch an attack on the israeli question, he would look like he was trying to score political points in a debate where he's supposed to be talking about the economy. one of the rules i have for the debates you don't fight with the moderator and you don't invade the other person's space. >> a violation of the newt gingrich rule which was to completely go after maria bartiromo and john harwood at the cnbc debate in michigan and make -- make them the target. >> he was looking for right wing base voters who hate the media. i don't think that's the situation here. when you fight with the moderator and som
a cartoon. mitt romney -- the u.s. should immediately bomb england. foreign policy with mitt romney. this is a cartoon that i had in my comic strip. we each have these -- i do not know. i am not sure if best and -- i promised i would not miss up your comic strip. we each do a comic strip so we are lucky as far as editorial cartoons. good to use the other side of our brands to read comics. i have been accused of making my way to political. this is my 9/11 tribute. it actually was originally a long strip. you have to turn your head to see it. i made it into an editorial cartoon. here is mitt romney having a candlelight vigil for osama bin laden. this is a cartoon i did the year after 9/11 about maybe some of the causes behind 9/11. this is also the year after 911. i call it the twin tepees. it marks the genocide that has happened. it was a reaction to some of the more excess of chest beating about 9/11. we never remember the other tragedies that have been on american soil. i do not really have anything to say about this. [laughter] i think the ladies and know what i am talking about.
there as well. the united states foreign policy towards the persian gulf has for decades focused squarely on ensuring the free flow of oil from the gulf to the aborted and the soviet union but in recent decades. our concern to the region has embroiled us in the two wars in the past 20 years and led to a significant military commitment of military assets in the region and the question arises almost immediately why does the united states expand such efforts and so much of its assets. we are in fact a number three we'll producer in the world and when we import less than 20% of our crude imports from the gulf. so these issues we are going to explores the global energy market, the changing place changing is the persian gulf oil and gas still important and likely to be in the future where the shiastan index in the immediate region when the impact on the region's ability to produce. we have the very distinguished panelists. on my right, dr. jean-francois seznec currently adjunct professor at georgetown university. and for the previous ten years, dr. seznec was visiting professor of georgetown un
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)